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    Labour’s Nuclear Question

    Can Labour find a way to bridge its divisions over Trident? Or will a policy to scrap the nuclear warheads strike a final nail into the party’s electoral coffin? BARRY WINTER calls for a national debate and a Labour-led referendum on the issue.

    Britain’s nuclear defence strategy has often sown deep divisions within the Labour movement. No less so today given Jeremy Corbyn’s ardent opposition to the party’s current policy to renew Trident. While 68 per cent of members today share his views, he faces formidable, not to say fierce criticism from within the party and the unions.

Features

featuredimage How the Co-op Lost its Purpose

Without its history, its politics and its connection to the wider movement, the Co-operative Group is just like any other ...

featuredimage Soldiers for Spain

Volunteers who fought in the Spanish civil war were political soldiers striking a blow against oppression across the continent, according ...

featuredimage Pigs, PR and Politics

GERRY LAVERY reviews Call Me Dave, the recent very unauthorised biography of the prime minister, and asks what Labour and ...

News

Funds Needed for Sylvia Pankhurst Statue

The campaign to build a London statue to the socialist suffragette, Sylvia Pankhurst, is calling for donations towards its goal of erecting a monument outside the Marx Memorial Library on Islington’s Clerkenwell Green.

Events

Talking Labour History

Paul Preston and Jane Martin will be the key speakers at the Labour Heritage annual general meeting on 21 May when discussions will focus on the Spanish Civil War and the education reformist and socialist, Caroline Benn.

Comment

The Housing Crisis Weaponised

The government does not intend to solve our housing crisis, says QUINTIN BRADLEY. Instead it is using it as a weapon of policy against the beliefs and attitudes that sustain the welfare state.

History

Hunting for the Real Keir Hardie

We should remember ‘diverse Keir Hardies’, argues DAVID HOWELL, versions of the ILP founder that stretch beyond the simplicities of socialist canonisation and patronising dismissal, but never attain the dubious establishment honour of ‘national treasure’.