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    Hardie’s ‘Sunshine of Socialism’ Speech

    One hundred years ago this month, members of the ILP gathered in Bradford for its ‘Coming of Age’ 21st anniversary conference. In his address to delegates, KEIR HARDIE, the ILP’s guiding spirit and the Labour Party’s first leader, outlined how far the organisation had come since it was founded in the same city in 1893.

    “The past 21 years have been years of continuous progress, but we are only at the beginning,” he said. Here we reproduce Hardie’s speech in full as an addendum to our series of historical profiles of ILPers published throughout 2013 to mark our 120th anniversary.

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