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    A Day for Ada

    The Labour left today could do with a few members like Ada Salter, the quietly-spoken, peace-loving ILPer whose pioneering work transformed south-east London in the early decades of the 20th century. MATTHEW BROWN attended the first Ada Salter Day.

    There have been many reasons in recent weeks to yearn for a different kind of left, and a different kind of Labour Party. The inaugural Ada Salter Day provided yet more cause to reflect on what a committed, campaigning, credible and radically-minded Labour movement can achieve, at its best, and how much is now under threat from its current sad state and potential demise.

Features

featuredimage Brexit: Do we Need a New Consensus?

DAVE BERRY discusses his experiences of the referendum campaign and calls for left-wing reform of the European Union. The referendum ...

featuredimage Brexit: Analysis and Action

“What has happened is that the protests against globalisation, capital and free markets by the disadvantaged has been captured by ...

featuredimage Brexit: Organising for Dangerous Times

“I am truly worried about our country. We are living in dangerous times.” So says Nick Lowles of Hope not ...

News

‘An Idea Whose Time Has Come’

A universal basic income could be one of the big progressive policies at the next election according to campaign group Compass which has published a report on the issue, saying it’s “an idea whose time has come”.

Events

Re-Dedication of ILP Volunteers’ Plaque

The role of ILP volunteers in the Spanish Civil War will be remembered at an event at the Working Class Movement Library in Salford on Saturday 24 September.

Comment

Labour in Crisis: A Statement from the ILP

The Labour Party is in mortal danger and the post-referendum crisis that now engulfs it genuinely threatens its very existence as a viable force in British politics.

History

Hunting for the Real Keir Hardie

We should remember ‘diverse Keir Hardies’, argues DAVID HOWELL, versions of the ILP founder that stretch beyond the simplicities of socialist canonisation and patronising dismissal, but never attain the dubious establishment honour of ‘national treasure’.